Letter Arts Review has a new publisher. Greg Sharp of Sea Hill Press will take over this role with the next edition. While this will be a change in ownership, the magazine will continue under Christopher Calderhead’s editorial and design direction. 
This is not the first time Letter Arts Review has changed management. Letter Arts Review was started by a commercial printer in Oklahoma in 1982 as Calligraphy Idea Exchange. After a few issues,Karyn Gilman took over as editor, and after a few more issues, she took over as publisher (owner) of the magazine. A number of issues later, the magazine’s name was changed to Letter Arts Review. Ms. Gilman continued as publisher through issue 14.4. Then with issue 15.1, John Neal became publisher. Christopher Calderhead, the current editor/designer, started with 21.4, taking over from editor Rose Folsom. Now with issue 35.2, Greg Sharp of Sea Hill Press will take over as publisher. 

Greg Sharp’s career has been in the world of printing and publishing, working with artists and authors to publish books, exhibit catalogs, and other publications. It began over thirty-five years ago when he started as an apprentice printer in Auckland, New Zealand. Greg completed the ten-thousand-hour training program in 1983. He never got along well with machines, and he did not continue as a pressman. Nonetheless, this printing experience was a strong foundation, and it allowed him to enter printing and publishing management. For a number of years, he brought the work of fabric artists into print as the managing editor of That Patchwork Place, a publisher of quilting and fiber arts books. He then moved into the emerging field of cooking shows, as part of the publishing and production team for celebrity chefs Graham Kerr, Nick Stellino, Madhur Jaffrey, Gary Rhodes, and others. 

For seven years, Greg worked for world-renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly at his studio in Seattle. Greg started that journey as general manager of Portland Press, Chihuly’s studio art division. Most recently, Greg has been the publisher of UK artist Bruce Munro’s work. Munro is known for his large-scale light installations. Greg started working with Munro in 2012 and has since produced books, merchandise, and two television documentaries about Bruce Munro’s work. 

Sea Hill Press offers its clients editorial/design services and specialist printing and production knowledge, working with authors to produce custom publications. The press has invested in high-end digital printing equipment and now produces many of its short-run books in-house. 

Greg writes: We are excited about building on Christopher’s fourteen years dedicated to Letter Arts Review. We are committed to upholding LAR’s quality standards and, together with Christopher, we want to continue the fine tradition of this magazine. With the global push on technology and the ever-increasing desire for more online information, publications like LAR are becoming rare. We at Sea Hill Press are firm believers that ink-on-paper publishing still remains one of the best ways to communicate artwork in the intimate experience of a print publication. 

In taking on LAR, my life will have gone full circle. Prior to beginning my printing apprenticeship, I had hoped to train as a traditional sign writer. Through most of my teens, I watched and imitated the masters to perfect my skills as a lettering artist. I dreamed of becoming one of them. Unfortunately the year I was ready to enter that field, there were no available sign-writing apprenticeships. Looking back, I feel blessed to have gone down the road of printing and publishing as it has offered me broad creative mediums, expanding technologies, and worldwide travel. Yet my love and fascination with lettering and type has been ever present. Still today, I have a passion for lettering and letterforms. 

John Neal will be working with us to ensure a smooth transition. We would be most grateful for your support as a subscriber as we look forward to many years ahead in service to the lettering art community through this beautiful magazine.

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Also See Letter from Christopher Calderhead
Editor and Designer, 
Letter Arts Review